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Added Nov 17 2017

American Greeters Home History Here is an interesting article from 2012 the Stapleton Front Porch newspaper written by Judith Schwartz about an East Colfax Neighborhood home on the National Register of Historic Places. Montclair Home A Haven for Greeters By Judith Schwartz South of Montview Blvd., at 1760 Ulster Street, a brick home with a wide front porch sits quietly back from the road— except GREETERS OF AMERICA is boldly carved into its front entry. Its story unfolds this way: Montclair incorporated in 1888. Baron von Richthofen, a cofounder, hoped Montclair would attract wealthier residents turned off by Denver’s “400 saloons and forty Market Street bordellos.” His vision was for a community in which “only tasteful houses of $1,000 will be allowed...Colfax Avenue will be graded and improved like Broadway...shade trees will be planted throughout...an artesian well will provide water...light towers will be erected...the town will be the pride of all Denver.” In 1902,Montclair became part of the new City and County of Denver and had less than 100 homes. One built in 1899, now 1740 Ulster, was situated on five acres that included an apple orchard. It became the property bought by the Greeters of America in 1921. Who were the Greeters? National hotel front-desk employees formed the Hotel Greeters of America in Denver in 1910 as a fraternal organization. Before interstate highways and mass car ownership, people traveled primarily by train. In the early 1900s, hotel clerks served as travel directors. The best way to exchange guests with clerk friends at other hotels was by personal telephone, telegram or postcard contact. Hotels advertised in The American Greeter, the organization’s magazine. Published in Denver, it distributed over 5,000 monthly copies nationwide plus Canada (1921-23 stats). Approximately 50 chapters existed in 1924. “Greeterism” was their creed; to serve their guests in every way. Organization goals were to: encourage better acquaintance and good fellowship among greeters, remove dishonest and unreliable hotel clerks, enhance their skills and, as a fraternal organization, assist their members in need. A national home was authorized at the New Orleans 1921 annual convention “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties... unable to care for themselves, and for the further purpose of affording a refuge in the dry climate of Colorado.” In 1922, construction began on a building on the previously acquired property with a breezeway connecting it to the existing building. On May 1, 1924, Mayor Stapleton conducted opening ceremonies. Financed and maintained by dues and donations from Greeter chapters (e.g., $1.50/year per member, 25 cents/year from women’s auxiliary, etc.), prominent Denver figures also donated money, furniture and other items. Residents cared for the orchards, gardens and chickens for healthy exercise. The December 1937 Greeters magazine notes the home then had four paid employees, including a physician who daily visited the 16 guests. One guest was expected to recover from his TB and six young men cured while at the home were back in responsible hotel positions; “29 guests have passed to the Great Beyond.” Most who died there were buried in a section of Fairmount Cemetery. Arrangements were made for members with extreme health conditions to be treated at more appropriate facilities. Miss Bess Wilson, “the beautiful and charming traveling saleswoman for the Ohio Varnish Company of Cleveland” visited Lindsey Sims who was “incapacitated from work.” He had shown her “many favors” when she stayed at the Waldorf Hotel in Dallas. She stated, “It is a wonderful institution–or rather a wonderful home....Why, I’d like to live there myself.” The Greeters of America home was dissolved in the 1950s and converted into two private residences. The 1924 building originally had no kitchen. It has a long corridor with eight bedrooms, four on each side, and contains 50 windows. A bathroom had a line of urinals. Present residents of the two homes believe food was prepared at the olderbuilding, which has a 600-square-foot living room and four bedrooms. The Greeters home was designated a Historic Landmark in the 1990s. Neighbors Evelyn Pryor and Britta Singer are exuberant about living with such an interesting heritage. The two households act as if the breezeway connector still exists, constantly visiting back and forth. Evelyn insists that whoever passed through over those 30 years only left behind “good spirits.” Facts presented here come from early copies of The American Greeter,archival in- formation from a former neighbor and hotel worker-related publications through the 1950s. Many gaps exist in the story of this organization and the home. If you have information on The Greeters of America,contact Judith Schwartz at judschwartz@msn.com and Tom Fesing at tfesing@gmail.com (photo 1) Two homes in Montclair were used by the Greeters of America “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties.” They operated from 1924 until the 1950s, when they became private residences.(photo) Two homes in Montclair were used by the Greeters of America “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties.” They operated from 1924 until the 1950s, when they became private residences. (photo 2) Greeters’ President W.E, Defenbacher in the mid-1920s just before taking off from the Denver airfield for a bird’s eye view of Denver. The composite photo from the Rocky Mountain News also shows the Greeter committee that showed Defenbacher the Greeter home.(photo) Greeters’ President W.E, Defenbacher in the mid-1920s just before taking off from the Denver airfield for a bird’s eye view of Denver. The composite photo from the Rocky Mountain News also shows the Greeter committee that showed Defenbacher the Greeter home. Link to history: https://www.dropbox.com/s/zcecjdg16ll4id f/Greeters%20Home.pdf?dl=0

Original article
https://www.facebook.com/EastColfaxNeighborhoodAssociation/photos/a.792359370806969.1073741829.170895849619994/1611105535599011/?type=3
Date published
November 18, 2017
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association, Denver, Colorado. 947 likes. A Registered Neighborhood Organization along East Colfax between Quebec and Yosemite!
    https://www.facebook.com

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