31 hours ago

2 days ago

5 days ago

East Colfax Neighborhood Association added 9 ...

American Greeters Home History Here is an interesting article from 2012 the Stapleton Front Porch newspaper written by Judith Schwartz about an East Colfax Neighborhood home on the National Register of Historic Places. Montclair Home A Haven for Greeters By Judith Schwartz South of Montview Blvd., at 1760 Ulster Street, a brick home with a wide front porch sits quietly back from the road— except GREETERS OF AMERICA is boldly carved into its front entry. Its story unfolds this way: Montclair incorporated in 1888. Baron von Richthofen, a cofounder, hoped Montclair would attract wealthier residents turned off by Denver’s “400 saloons and forty Market Street bordellos.” His vision was for a community in which “only tasteful houses of $1,000 will be allowed...Colfax Avenue will be graded and improved like Broadway...shade trees will be planted throughout...an artesian well will provide water...light towers will be erected...the town will be the pride of all Denver.” In 1902,Montclair became part of the new City and County of Denver and had less than 100 homes. One built in 1899, now 1740 Ulster, was situated on five acres that included an apple orchard. It became the property bought by the Greeters of America in 1921. Who were the Greeters? National hotel front-desk employees formed the Hotel Greeters of America in Denver in 1910 as a fraternal organization. Before interstate highways and mass car ownership, people traveled primarily by train. In the early 1900s, hotel clerks served as travel directors. The best way to exchange guests with clerk friends at other hotels was by personal telephone, telegram or postcard contact. Hotels advertised in The American Greeter, the organization’s magazine. Published in Denver, it distributed over 5,000 monthly copies nationwide plus Canada (1921-23 stats). Approximately 50 chapters existed in 1924. “Greeterism” was their creed; to serve their guests in every way. Organization goals were to: encourage better acquaintance and good fellowship among greeters, remove dishonest and unreliable hotel clerks, enhance their skills and, as a fraternal organization, assist their members in need. A national home was authorized at the New Orleans 1921 annual convention “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties... unable to care for themselves, and for the further purpose of affording a refuge in the dry climate of Colorado.” In 1922, construction began on a building on the previously acquired property with a breezeway connecting it to the existing building. On May 1, 1924, Mayor Stapleton conducted opening ceremonies. Financed and maintained by dues and donations from Greeter chapters (e.g., $1.50/year per member, 25 cents/year from women’s auxiliary, etc.), prominent Denver figures also donated money, furniture and other items. Residents cared for the orchards, gardens and chickens for healthy exercise. The December 1937 Greeters magazine notes the home then had four paid employees, including a physician who daily visited the 16 guests. One guest was expected to recover from his TB and six young men cured while at the home were back in responsible hotel positions; “29 guests have passed to the Great Beyond.” Most who died there were buried in a section of Fairmount Cemetery. Arrangements were made for members with extreme health conditions to be treated at more appropriate facilities. Miss Bess Wilson, “the beautiful and charming traveling saleswoman for the Ohio Varnish Company of Cleveland” visited Lindsey Sims who was “incapacitated from work.” He had shown her “many favors” when she stayed at the Waldorf Hotel in Dallas. She stated, “It is a wonderful institution–or rather a wonderful home....Why, I’d like to live there myself.” The Greeters of America home was dissolved in the 1950s and converted into two private residences. The 1924 building originally had no kitchen. It has a long corridor with eight bedrooms, four on each side, and contains 50 windows. A bathroom had a line of urinals. Present residents of the two homes believe food was prepared at the olderbuilding, which has a 600-square-foot living room and four bedrooms. The Greeters home was designated a Historic Landmark in the 1990s. Neighbors Evelyn Pryor and Britta Singer are exuberant about living with such an interesting heritage. The two households act as if the breezeway connector still exists, constantly visiting back and forth. Evelyn insists that whoever passed through over those 30 years only left behind “good spirits.” Facts presented here come from early copies of The American Greeter,archival in- formation from a former neighbor and hotel worker-related publications through the 1950s. Many gaps exist in the story of this organization and the home. If you have information on The Greeters of America,contact Judith Schwartz at judschwartz@msn.com and Tom Fesing at tfesing@gmail.com (photo 1) Two homes in Montclair were used by the Greeters of America “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties.” They operated from 1924 until the 1950s, when they became private residences.(photo) Two homes in Montclair were used by the Greeters of America “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties.” They operated from 1924 until the 1950s, when they became private residences. (photo 2) Greeters’ President W.E, Defenbacher in the mid-1920s just before taking off from the Denver airfield for a bird’s eye view of Denver. The composite photo from the Rocky Mountain News also shows the Greeter committee that showed Defenbacher the Greeter home.(photo) Greeters’ President W.E, Defenbacher in the mid-1920s just before taking off from the Denver airfield for a bird’s eye view of Denver. The composite photo from the Rocky Mountain News also shows the Greeter committee that showed Defenbacher the Greeter home. Link to history: https://www.dropbox.com/s/zcecjdg16ll4idf/Greeters%20Home.pdf?dl=0

    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association, Denver, Colorado. 947 likes. A Registered Neighborhood Organization along East Colfax between Quebec and Yosemite!
    https://www.facebook.com

6 days ago

Nov 16

pr_things posted 1 photo to Flickr:

Nov 16

Nov 16

Grand Opening of the Colfax Museum!

Great news! The Colfax Museum, dedicated to Schuyler Colfax and the longest, wickedest (as in awesome) street in North America that bears his name, opens 11/18/2017! Join us 2:00-5:00pm on Saturday to celebrate the accomplishment, at 6109 E. Colfax Avenue in Denver.

    Grand Opening of the Colfax Museum!
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 14

Nov 11

Get to Know Your Neighbors! Great advice fro...

Get to Know Your Neighbors! Great advice from the Lowry Community Master Association! Neighbors, please make sure you know the name and contact information of (at least) your immediate neighbors. Knowing how to get in touch with your neighbors helps make your neighborhood and street safer. They have created a simple contact sheet, which you can use. Here are some real-life situations that highlight why this is important: Denver Police have reported many garage doors left open by residents who were not at home. Criminals drive neighborhoods looking for open garage doors - it takes seconds and garage theft is reported weekly by your neighborhood residents. Know how to alert your neighbor to a garage door left open and know who to call if you suspect you left your own garage door open. Make sure your neighbors know how to reach you, especially when you are out of town. 'Tis the season...for package theft from porches. If you know an important package has been delivered and you may not be home for a while, send a text to your neighbors to see if anyone is home to grab it for you. Criminals that have robbed a house have hidden in neighbors' yards while police search for them. Know how to alert your neighbors to on-going criminal activity. When a few homes are easy targets for theft and other crimes, it attracts crime to the entire neighborhood. The Denver Police Department illustrates over and over again how absolutely critical it is to know your neighbors and how to reach them. Start getting involved with your neighborhood by coming to neighborhood meetings every month the Denver Police Department is there every month. Next one is November 21 at 6:30 PM at 14th and Tamarac, close enough to walk to. The East Colfax Neighborhood Association EastColfaxNeighborhood@gmail.com http://www.EastColfaxNeighborhood.org https://www.twitter.com/EastColfaxNBHD https://www.eastcolfax.nextdoor.com https://www.facebook.com/EastColfaxNeighborhoodAssociation Sign-up for our mailing list: http://eepurl.com/cZ_tDv

    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    Get to Know Your Neighbors! Great advice from the Lowry Community Master Association! Neighbors, please make sure you know the name and contact information of (at least) your immediate neighbors....
    https://www.facebook.com

Nov 11

Nov 10

Nov 09

East Colfax Neighborhood Association added 10...

1950’s East ColfaxNeighborhood History from Ken Harvey, past owner of Ken’s Barber Shop at Ulster & East Colfax Avenue Stedman's Shoe Service was across the street from Rockybilt hamburgers (recently the new Buffalo Bill's Wings and Things Chicken House and Yoisho's). A lot of people went to that shoe service on the corner of Colfax and Quebec. The Loop drugstore and the shoe service were in the same block. A Japanese couple owned the Loop; his name was Long and her name was Chick. They had that drugstore a long time. Stedman’s left that location sometime later and put in a shop down in the Mayfair Shopping Center. It is still under the Stedman name. I don't know what happened to Mr. Stedman. Going east a block or two was a place called Bud Karchers and it was selling foreign cars. His place later turned into Skyline Dodge. The dealership moved up there to the other side of the block to what had been the old Millers supermarket on the corner of Colfax and Poplar Street. He had a big dealership there. Dairy Queen was fairly close to one block the side of Syracuse and that business is still there. There were four service stations on the corners of Syracuse and Colfax, Doc's Conoco and a Mobil station across the street from there on the northwest corner. There was another station on the southwest corner. Across the street was the station I went to and that was Dewey’s Standard at Colfax and Syracuse. Going east, on the next corner at Spruce was a place called Cadillac Furniture. It did fair and then PMM Western Wear came in there (where the current Family Dollar store is). It was really a growing business they sold probably more western boots than anybody in the city and they had 7,000 pairs of boots in there. Across the street from PMM Western Wear on the same side of Colfax was the Beacon Supper Club that was a really good thing. It was probably one of the most money making places on East Colfax. They had half a block going east to the alley and then they had a pretty good size piece of land in the back where they could park. There wasn't another business between the beacon and the alley. Across the street from there was a place called Hack’s Little Lot. It was a little place where they dealt mostly in foreign cars. Hack’s was a successful business and they stayed there a long time. Next door to him on the west side was a place called Burns Standard Oil. Burns and his boys ran a Standard gas station there it was a small station on the corner of Colfax and Spruce. Then there was the Hanger Bar on the corner of Tamarac and Colfax. In 1954 Tommy Falarite had the bar for some time. The man that had it before him was Harry Kaiser. Harry was a retired police officer in Denver. He was the man that opened up the Hanger Bar. Shorty was the name of the manager. They used to call him Mr. 5 x 5. He was a really heavy man. Tommy had been sick a while and Shorty was around the bar a lot. He was wide as he was tall. He was very over weight and he had diabetes too and in time he lost his leg. I knew Shorty pretty well he came in my shop for many haircuts. Across the street at the corner of Tamarac and Colfax was Naylor's vet clinic (Montclair Animal Clinic today). Dr. Naylor sold out to Dr. Sergeant. Dr. Sergeant grew up in the neighborhood and went to vet school at Fort Collins. The day that he got out of school he went to work for Dr. Naylor. He bought the place from Dr. Naylor. Dr. Sergeants had a brother that lived just a block away from the clinic. Going further down the street on the corner, east of the Hanger Bar was a nice Philips station run by two brothers. One of the brothers was Dick and the other I cannot quite remember. Dick and his brother had a nice Philips station on the corner of Ulster and Colfax and they stayed there a good 20 years. Across the street was a place called the Western Drive-in that place was there in 1954. The owners name was Dave and I bought a lot of hamburgers from that place. My barber shop was just across the street. He got despondent over something one day and came into my shop and said, "did you hear what happened at Dave's Drive-in last night? He went out in his car and shot himself." The Western Drive-in was then sold to a fellow by the name of Jack he kept it for a while. I don't know what happened to it Dave had that place two or three years before 1954 and then he did himself in. Down on the corner of the Western Drive-in it was a nice big trailer lot and there was a big fellow that ran it. His name was Tom and I don't know who the owners were but it was a very successful business they closed it later and moved it to West Colfax. Across the street to the north up to Ulster on the north side of the street was Stokes Drugstore. Coming east there was a little hardware store and then there was Eugene’s Beauty Shop run by Elizabeth Bath. I was in the next building. Ken's Barber service. I bought out George's Barber service and I was there for seven years. I gave quite a few haircuts and they cost about one dollars or so and I made $80 to $90 a week. When I first went in there I did not make much but when I sold out $90 to $100 was a pretty good week. In 1954 next to me was a pet store. The pet store moved out after 1 to 1 1/2 years the business that went in there was the first Color Tile store in Denver. Color Tile stayed there for a long time. The next building would've been the original Paisan’s. There was a vacant lot next to Paisan’s nothing was ever built on it. It was on the east side of Paisan’s. The original owner Jim Sando was an Italian immigrant he jumped ship in the New York Harbor and eventually got to Denver and started Paisan’s. His sisters and brothers are all in Italy he started right out with some of the best pizza people that ever eaten in the Denver area. He sold out to a guy named Rolly about a year before 1954. Sando moved to North Denver and started a place called the Three Sons Pizzeria. Three Sons has been there a long time. Jim Sando has been dead quite a long time, I think his three boys are still involved in the restaurant business. I think it is in the area of Tejon and Sheridan. After Paisan's there was a place that was owned by George called George’s barbershop. George's sister owns the building there and the building is occupied by La Bolita’s Restaurant serving Mexican food. That was owned by a Phil Murray. Phil built it up to a successful bar and restaurant and people could go in there until five in the morning when other bars were closed up. He closed his bar but still served food. People would come in from all other bars for food. He ran mean hours. Bill stayed there for a long time I used to go over to Phil’s and I remember in 1961 when we had the big flood in Denver all the lights went out and I couldn't work anymore so I went over to La Bolita’s to have a beer and I got to talking to Phil and he said, "well my beer is all going to get warm. We are aren't going to have power until the next day or later" so we just sat there and talked and drank beer and had candles going on I don't think two other people came in the place and none of the help showed up. So we sat and talked and he wouldn't sell me any beer but we drink beer all night and I got polluted. I remembered going out to my car and East Colfax was so dark the only lights were the lights on my car. I knew Phil pretty good he was an excellent musician he played the vibraphone. He had a three or four piece combo in there every night and people went in there to dance and they would dance on the dance floor. Phil had a marvelous way with people there was never any trouble in there he just did a nice business and build that place from scratch. They were already opened in 1954 I believe George's sister actually opened it and then sold it to Phil. The sister went downtown and opened up a place by the same name, La Bolita’s for a long time. Phil stayed and I left the barbershop in 1968. I think Phil stayed another 10 years and then he finally gave up and went to work for the City of Denver, he had a good job with the City and County of Denver and I haven't seen him in years. He must be pretty close to retirement age. There was the Sinclair station on Valentia and Colfax and it is still there. Back across the street on the corner of Colfax and Ulster it was a big beauty shop at one time. Earl Lubin ran the barber union. He was in that block and he got rid of that barbershop about 1960. Nextdoor to him was GG's bar and they have since moved around the corner. He sold out to Bill Klinger who kept the shop until about a year after I left. Barbering was tough then nobody was cutting their hair. Klinger got mad because his landlady was going to raise the rent and he told me if she raises the rent five dollars I won't pay at all close the shop. I think she was going to raise the rent $25 so he closed up. His shop was between you Uinta & Valentia on the south side (located where Buffalo Bills Wings and Things is). Arden liquor store was right next door to the barbershop. Then you start getting into all those motels. When I was there they built one called the Château Motor Lodge at Valentia and Colfax (now Orlando’s Apartments). There was a nice old club at Yosemite called the Ex-Veterans or Ex-Serviceman’s club. They had good dances there and it was a bar. It was kind of Adobe and out on the north side of the street it was a two-story building that we get some good bands in there and we went up there to dance and it was really nice. On the south side of the street was the Apple Tree Shanty. Dr. Peterson was the owner in 1954. Dr. Peterson sold out to a fellow by the name of Don Olson. Don had two partners and my daughter married Don and they ran the Apple Tree Shanty for approximately six years then they got a divorce. Olson finally sold his interest to Ray Sanford who was one of the original partners of Don's. One of those guys dropped out when he got hurt in a parachute jumping accident. I believe Ray Sanford came in after that. Don, Ray and another we're partners and Ray finally bought the whole thing.

    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association, Denver, Colorado. 946 likes. A Registered Neighborhood Organization along East Colfax between Quebec and Yosemite!
    https://www.facebook.com

Nov 09

East Colfax Neighborhood Association added 8 ...

1950’s East ColfaxNeighborhood History from Ken Harvey, past owner of Ken’s Barber Shop at Ulster & East Colfax Avenue Stedman's Shoe Service was across the street from Rockybilt hamburgers (recently the new Buffalo Bill's Wings and Things Chicken House and Yoisho's). A lot of people went to that shoe service on the corner of Colfax and Quebec. The Loop drugstore and the shoe service were in the same block. A Japanese couple owned the Loop; his name was Long and her name was Chick. They had that drugstore a long time. Stedman’s left that location sometime later and put in a shop down in the Mayfair Shopping Center. It is still under the Stedman name. I don't know what happened to Mr. Stedman. Going east a block or two was a place called Bud Karchers and it was selling foreign cars. His place later turned into Skyline Dodge. The dealership moved up there to the other side of the block to what had been the old Millers supermarket on the corner of Colfax and Poplar Street. He had a big dealership there. Dairy Queen was fairly close to one block the side of Syracuse and that business is still there. There were four service stations on the corners of Syracuse and Colfax, Doc's Conoco and a Mobil station across the street from there on the northwest corner. There was another station on the southwest corner. Across the street was the station I went to and that was Dewey’s Standard at Colfax and Syracuse. Going east, on the next corner at Spruce was a place called Cadillac Furniture. It did fair and then PMM Western Wear came in there (where the current Family Dollar store is). It was really a growing business they sold probably more western boots than anybody in the city and they had 7,000 pairs of boots in there. Across the street from PMM Western Wear on the same side of Colfax was the Beacon Supper Club that was a really good thing. It was probably one of the most money making places on East Colfax. They had half a block going east to the alley and then they had a pretty good size piece of land in the back where they could park. There wasn't another business between the beacon and the alley. Across the street from there was a place called Hack’s Little Lot. It was a little place where they dealt mostly in foreign cars. Hack’s was a successful business and they stayed there a long time. Next door to him on the west side was a place called Burns Standard Oil. Burns and his boys ran a Standard gas station there it was a small station on the corner of Colfax and Spruce. Then there was the Hanger Bar on the corner of Tamarac and Colfax. In 1954 Tommy Falarite had the bar for some time. The man that had it before him was Harry Kaiser. Harry was a retired police officer in Denver. He was the man that opened up the Hanger Bar. Shorty was the name of the manager. They used to call him Mr. 5 x 5. He was a really heavy man. Tommy had been sick a while and Shorty was around the bar a lot. He was wide as he was tall. He was very over weight and he had diabetes too and in time he lost his leg. I knew Shorty pretty well he came in my shop for many haircuts. Across the street at the corner of Tamarac and Colfax was Naylor's vet clinic (Montclair Animal Clinic today). Dr. Naylor sold out to Dr. Sergeant. Dr. Sergeant grew up in the neighborhood and went to vet school at Fort Collins. The day that he got out of school he went to work for Dr. Naylor. He bought the place from Dr. Naylor. Dr. Sergeants had a brother that lived just a block away from the clinic. Going further down the street on the corner, east of the Hanger Bar was a nice Philips station run by two brothers. One of the brothers was Dick and the other I cannot quite remember. Dick and his brother had a nice Philips station on the corner of Ulster and Colfax and they stayed there a good 20 years. Across the street was a place called the Western Drive-in that place was there in 1954. The owners name was Dave and I bought a lot of hamburgers from that place. My barber shop was just across the street. He got despondent over something one day and came into my shop and said, "did you hear what happened at Dave's Drive-in last night? He went out in his car and shot himself." The Western Drive-in was then sold to a fellow by the name of Jack he kept it for a while. I don't know what happened to it Dave had that place two or three years before 1954 and then he did himself in. Down on the corner of the Western Drive-in it was a nice big trailer lot and there was a big fellow that ran it. His name was Tom and I don't know who the owners were but it was a very successful business they closed it later and moved it to West Colfax. Across the street to the north up to Ulster on the north side of the street was Stokes Drugstore. Coming east there was a little hardware store and then there was Eugene’s Beauty Shop run by Elizabeth Bath. I was in the next building. Ken's Barber service. I bought out George's Barber service and I was there for seven years. I gave quite a few haircuts and they cost about one dollars or so and I made $80 to $90 a week. When I first went in there I did not make much but when I sold out $90 to $100 was a pretty good week. In 1954 next to me was a pet store. The pet store moved out after 1 to 1 1/2 years the business that went in there was the first Color Tile store in Denver. Color Tile stayed there for a long time. The next building would've been the original Paisan’s. There was a vacant lot next to Paisan’s nothing was ever built on it. It was on the east side of Paisan’s. The original owner Jim Sando was an Italian immigrant he jumped ship in the New York Harbor and eventually got to Denver and started Paisan’s. His sisters and brothers are all in Italy he started right out with some of the best pizza people that ever eaten in the Denver area. He sold out to a guy named Rolly about a year before 1954. Sando moved to North Denver and started a place called the Three Sons Pizzeria. Three Sons has been there a long time. Jim Sando has been dead quite a long time, I think his three boys are still involved in the restaurant business. I think it is in the area of Tejon and Sheridan. After Paisan's there was a place that was owned by George called George’s barbershop. George's sister owns the building there and the building is occupied by La Bolita’s Restaurant serving Mexican food. That was owned by a Phil Murray. Phil built it up to a successful bar and restaurant and people could go in there until five in the morning when other bars were closed up. He closed his bar but still served food. People would come in from all other bars for food. He ran mean hours. Bill stayed there for a long time I used to go over to Phil’s and I remember in 1961 when we had the big flood in Denver all the lights went out and I couldn't work anymore so I went over to La Bolita’s to have a beer and I got to talking to Phil and he said, "well my beer is all going to get warm. We are aren't going to have power until the next day or later" so we just sat there and talked and drank beer and had candles going on I don't think two other people came in the place and none of the help showed up. So we sat and talked and he wouldn't sell me any beer but we drink beer all night and I got polluted. I remembered going out to my car and East Colfax was so dark the only lights were the lights on my car. I knew Phil pretty good he was an excellent musician he played the vibraphone. He had a three or four piece combo in there every night and people went in there to dance and they would dance on the dance floor. Phil had a marvelous way with people there was never any trouble in there he just did a nice business and build that place from scratch. They were already opened in 1954 I believe George's sister actually opened it and then sold it to Phil. The sister went downtown and opened up a place by the same name, La Bolita’s for a long time. Phil stayed and I left the barbershop in 1968. I think Phil stayed another 10 years and then he finally gave up and went to work for the City of Denver, he had a good job with the City and County of Denver and I haven't seen him in years. He must be pretty close to retirement age. There was the Sinclair station on Valentia and Colfax and it is still there. Back across the street on the corner of Colfax and Ulster it was a big beauty shop at one time. Earl Lubin ran the barber union. He was in that block and he got rid of that barbershop about 1960. Nextdoor to him was GG's bar and they have since moved around the corner. He sold out to Bill Klinger who kept the shop until about a year after I left. Barbering was tough then nobody was cutting their hair. Klinger got mad because his landlady was going to raise the rent and he told me if she raises the rent five dollars I won't pay at all close the shop. I think she was going to raise the rent $25 so he closed up. His shop was between you Uinta & Valentia on the south side (located where Buffalo Bills Wings and Things is). Arden liquor store was right next door to the barbershop. Then you start getting into all those motels. When I was there they built one called the Château Motor Lodge at Valentia and Colfax (now Orlando’s Apartments). There was a nice old club at Yosemite called the Ex-Veterans or Ex-Serviceman’s club. They had good dances there and it was a bar. It was kind of Adobe and out on the north side of the street it was a two-story building that we get some good bands in there and we went up there to dance and it was really nice. On the south side of the street was the Apple Tree Shanty. Dr. Peterson was the owner in 1954. Dr. Peterson sold out to a fellow by the name of Don Olson. Don had two partners and my daughter married Don and they ran the Apple Tree Shanty for approximately six years then they got a divorce. Olson finally sold his interest to Ray Sanford who was one of the original partners of Don's. One of those guys dropped out when he got hurt in a parachute jumping accident. I believe Ray Sanford came in after that. Don, Ray and another we're partners and Ray finally bought the whole thing.

    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association, Denver, Colorado. 947 likes. A Registered Neighborhood Organization along East Colfax between Quebec and Yosemite!
    https://www.facebook.com

Nov 09

Ms. C's

By Daniel M.

    Ms. C's
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 09

Charlie Chan Village

Today a great mystery was solved. For years I had been trying to track down an old East Colfax motel called Charlie Chan Village. In my mind, I saw something mythical, like Grauman's Chinese Theater. The good news is Jennifer and Bonnie at the Aurora History Museum found something about it today! The (not so bad I guess) news is that it was a laundry service...

    Charlie Chan Village
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 08

Nov 07

Nov 06

Denver Police Blotter: Resident enraged by his neighbor’s band

Man in traffic. On Oct. 28, an officer on patrol on the 8200 block of East Colfax Avenue reported seeing a man walk into the street as vehicles approached. Drivers slowed and swerved...

This article has 1 other Denver location (Show)

...my car go. A man called police Oct. 30 to report an auto theft at 1050 W. Colfax Ave. The man told police he parked his car and walked across the street to the...

    Denver Police Blotter: Resident enraged by his neighbor's band
    Rock on. According to a police report, on Oct. 29, a resident on the 2700 block of North King Street called police to complain about a neighbor playing amplified music. The resident had complained previously about the neighbor practicing with his band after 10 p.m., according to a police report.
    http://www.denverpost.com

Nov 05

Black is the New Orange

Black is the new Orange? I know Colfax Avenue is down in there somewhere...

    Black is the New Orange
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 04

East Colfax Neighborhood Association added 13...

The Beacon Supper Club previously located at 7800 East Colfax Avenue was one of the most popular East Denver hangouts for decades. The Beacon was located at Spruce Street & East Colfax. The Beacon was opened in the 1940's after WWII like many neighborhood businesses since all the GI's were returning home and Lowry Air Force base. The owners, Willie Hartzell and Jerry Bakke showcased Vaudeville acts and comedy troupes at the club. The Beacon closed down on January 3, 1965. Willie Hartzell would die 5 years later on May 31, 1970. After the Beacon closed the following businesses have operated at the location: Spruce Street Bar, Shakey’s Pizza, Casa del Sol Restaurant, Pandora's Mexican Restaurant, The Office - Tap House, and now Shepe's Mexican disco and Bar, which recently was a victim of arson. The postcards are from the 1940's and 50's and the ad from the Rocky Mountain News in 1959. #EastColfaxNeighborhood #EastColfaxNBHD

    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association, Denver, Colorado. 944 likes. A Registered Neighborhood Organization along East Colfax between Quebec and Yosemite!
    https://www.facebook.com

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7900-7999 E. 16th Ave.