2 days ago

3 days ago

6 days ago

East Colfax Neighborhood Association added 9 ...

American Greeters Home History Here is an interesting article from 2012 the Stapleton Front Porch newspaper written by Judith Schwartz about an East Colfax Neighborhood home on the National Register of Historic Places. Montclair Home A Haven for Greeters By Judith Schwartz South of Montview Blvd., at 1760 Ulster Street, a brick home with a wide front porch sits quietly back from the road— except GREETERS OF AMERICA is boldly carved into its front entry. Its story unfolds this way: Montclair incorporated in 1888. Baron von Richthofen, a cofounder, hoped Montclair would attract wealthier residents turned off by Denver’s “400 saloons and forty Market Street bordellos.” His vision was for a community in which “only tasteful houses of $1,000 will be allowed...Colfax Avenue will be graded and improved like Broadway...shade trees will be planted throughout...an artesian well will provide water...light towers will be erected...the town will be the pride of all Denver.” In 1902,Montclair became part of the new City and County of Denver and had less than 100 homes. One built in 1899, now 1740 Ulster, was situated on five acres that included an apple orchard. It became the property bought by the Greeters of America in 1921. Who were the Greeters? National hotel front-desk employees formed the Hotel Greeters of America in Denver in 1910 as a fraternal organization. Before interstate highways and mass car ownership, people traveled primarily by train. In the early 1900s, hotel clerks served as travel directors. The best way to exchange guests with clerk friends at other hotels was by personal telephone, telegram or postcard contact. Hotels advertised in The American Greeter, the organization’s magazine. Published in Denver, it distributed over 5,000 monthly copies nationwide plus Canada (1921-23 stats). Approximately 50 chapters existed in 1924. “Greeterism” was their creed; to serve their guests in every way. Organization goals were to: encourage better acquaintance and good fellowship among greeters, remove dishonest and unreliable hotel clerks, enhance their skills and, as a fraternal organization, assist their members in need. A national home was authorized at the New Orleans 1921 annual convention “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties... unable to care for themselves, and for the further purpose of affording a refuge in the dry climate of Colorado.” In 1922, construction began on a building on the previously acquired property with a breezeway connecting it to the existing building. On May 1, 1924, Mayor Stapleton conducted opening ceremonies. Financed and maintained by dues and donations from Greeter chapters (e.g., $1.50/year per member, 25 cents/year from women’s auxiliary, etc.), prominent Denver figures also donated money, furniture and other items. Residents cared for the orchards, gardens and chickens for healthy exercise. The December 1937 Greeters magazine notes the home then had four paid employees, including a physician who daily visited the 16 guests. One guest was expected to recover from his TB and six young men cured while at the home were back in responsible hotel positions; “29 guests have passed to the Great Beyond.” Most who died there were buried in a section of Fairmount Cemetery. Arrangements were made for members with extreme health conditions to be treated at more appropriate facilities. Miss Bess Wilson, “the beautiful and charming traveling saleswoman for the Ohio Varnish Company of Cleveland” visited Lindsey Sims who was “incapacitated from work.” He had shown her “many favors” when she stayed at the Waldorf Hotel in Dallas. She stated, “It is a wonderful institution–or rather a wonderful home....Why, I’d like to live there myself.” The Greeters of America home was dissolved in the 1950s and converted into two private residences. The 1924 building originally had no kitchen. It has a long corridor with eight bedrooms, four on each side, and contains 50 windows. A bathroom had a line of urinals. Present residents of the two homes believe food was prepared at the olderbuilding, which has a 600-square-foot living room and four bedrooms. The Greeters home was designated a Historic Landmark in the 1990s. Neighbors Evelyn Pryor and Britta Singer are exuberant about living with such an interesting heritage. The two households act as if the breezeway connector still exists, constantly visiting back and forth. Evelyn insists that whoever passed through over those 30 years only left behind “good spirits.” Facts presented here come from early copies of The American Greeter,archival in- formation from a former neighbor and hotel worker-related publications through the 1950s. Many gaps exist in the story of this organization and the home. If you have information on The Greeters of America,contact Judith Schwartz at judschwartz@msn.com and Tom Fesing at tfesing@gmail.com (photo 1) Two homes in Montclair were used by the Greeters of America “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties.” They operated from 1924 until the 1950s, when they became private residences.(photo) Two homes in Montclair were used by the Greeters of America “to provide a haven for its aged and infirm members without home ties.” They operated from 1924 until the 1950s, when they became private residences. (photo 2) Greeters’ President W.E, Defenbacher in the mid-1920s just before taking off from the Denver airfield for a bird’s eye view of Denver. The composite photo from the Rocky Mountain News also shows the Greeter committee that showed Defenbacher the Greeter home.(photo) Greeters’ President W.E, Defenbacher in the mid-1920s just before taking off from the Denver airfield for a bird’s eye view of Denver. The composite photo from the Rocky Mountain News also shows the Greeter committee that showed Defenbacher the Greeter home. Link to history: https://www.dropbox.com/s/zcecjdg16ll4idf/Greeters%20Home.pdf?dl=0

    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association, Denver, Colorado. 947 likes. A Registered Neighborhood Organization along East Colfax between Quebec and Yosemite!
    https://www.facebook.com

Nov 16

Nov 16

Grand Opening of the Colfax Museum!

Great news! The Colfax Museum, dedicated to Schuyler Colfax and the longest, wickedest (as in awesome) street in North America that bears his name, opens 11/18/2017! Join us 2:00-5:00pm on Saturday to celebrate the accomplishment, at 6109 E. Colfax Avenue in Denver.

    Grand Opening of the Colfax Museum!
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 15

Nov 14

Nov 11

Nov 10

Nov 09

Ms. C's

By Daniel M.

    Ms. C's
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 09

Charlie Chan Village

Today a great mystery was solved. For years I had been trying to track down an old East Colfax motel called Charlie Chan Village. In my mind, I saw something mythical, like Grauman's Chinese Theater. The good news is Jennifer and Bonnie at the Aurora History Museum found something about it today! The (not so bad I guess) news is that it was a laundry service...

    Charlie Chan Village
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 08

  • Larceny

Nov 07

Nov 05

Black is the New Orange

Black is the new Orange? I know Colfax Avenue is down in there somewhere...

    Black is the New Orange
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 04

East Colfax Neighborhood Association added 19...

This interview is from one of the older residents Phyllis Dixon in the East Colfax Neighborhood, whose house at 1785 Trenton Street was built in 1925. Phyliss Dixon Interview: My parents built this house in 1925. My dad was a patient at Fitzsimmons and my mother was an Army nurse. That's where they met. They moved here in 1925. After my mother died my father's health was not so good so when I got married I didn't leave home. I brought my husband home instead. The house has been remodeled repeatedly because it was so small. I was not born yet when they moved here. I am the youngest of three. My sisters went to Ashley elementary the day it opened in 1929. All three of us went to Ashley. Of course it was just the little corner part at that time. We had a half-time kindergarten teacher and a half time principal and we shared them with Montclair Elementary which is now the Paddington School at Quebec and E. 13th Ave.. Miss Lyons was the kindergarten teacher and Mrs. Godsmitten was the principal. I know the last year I was at Ashley elementary it was small enough that we didn't have a fifth-grade class, the fifth grade class was divided between the fourth and the sixth grades. There wasn't much around here at that time. The 1700 block of Spruce Street was filled in on the side. 19th Ave. stopped at Rosemary and the house on the north east corner with its redbrick was there. Between Rosemary and Quebec people had driven cars through it but it wasn't a Road. There was one little house that was there but most of it was vacant land except for a couple of houses on E. 17th Ave. There is that big house at E. 17th Ave. and Quince Street, the pretty White one belonged to the Carsons that owned the Carsons Grocery Company and Dairy. It was a real big house that they remodeled and put the garage on it used to have the great huge lilac bushes. Then there was a house across from that. Then there was a house at 17th Ave. and Rosemary a red brick house nothing further up those blocks. Of course the park (McNichols) had a greenhouse in the southwestern corner and a little old house without windows. It was simply four walls. Where McNichols park is now was just a vacant lot and the greenhouse. The greenhouse was an active business. My folks built our house in 1925 and I was born here in 1929. The winter of 1932-1933 was the first years I could remember. I know that over here on Ulster Street those two big houses on the east side at 1740 and 1760 were there. The National Greeters Home was for retired hotel workers and had a big orchard. Over where Evergeen Apartments (now Advenir at Stapleton) is now that was the Jewish Ex-Patients Tubercular home. They had three or four buildings. Tamarac never went through from E. 19th Ave. to Colfax. I think there were four buildings. Then down about Ulster Street At Colfax I think were some little business buildings that were torn down eventually. These were all people who lived in the back of their stores. Next to the store there was some kind of feed store with turkeys (Slaven’s Turkey Hatchery). It was only there a few years. (It later became the Plantation Restaurant). There were a few other little things on Colfax. No businesses on the south side, none at all. But there were a few people who lived on East Colfax. I had friends who lived east of here and they had running water but there were not on the sewer line. I would say that probably about 1940 over at E. 19th Ave. and Spruce Street that they just got indoor plumbing about that time. When this house was built it wasn't on the sewer line. They had a cesspool and had running water and electricity. The streets were not paved until 1946 after the war, it may have been closer to 1950. Montview Blvd had a surface and E. 17th Ave. did and of course East Colfax Avenue, but the rest of the neighborhood streets were gravel. There was a sidewalk in the 1600 block of Trenton Street. We couldn't rollerskate around here because there weren't any sidewalks. My husband was raised over at E. 16th Ave. in Pontiac street. Of course, he was allowed out and he said he and his friends used to go over and rollerskate on the runways at the old Stapleton Airport. I remember going up on the hill by the school when they had airshows with parachute jumpers and wing walkers to watch and when we went over the hill to get pollywogs. Used to be lots of little swamps over at the airport. The little house across the street that sets back was the garage and they were going to build a house in front and they dug a basement and then 20 years somebody built a home on the foundation. In the corner house was Tom and Marie Hendricks. Tom made leather jackets. The guys would bring in their deer hides. He would send them into be tanned and then would make jackets out of them. They were there for years and years. She had typhoid fever and was an invalid for many years. We had chickens but that wasn't unusual at the time. During the war lots of people had chickens because there wasn't enough to read points for meat. We had chickens for a long time. My mother brought us to ducks and my sister dropped one duck after she had it 15 minutes and it died, and the other one lived for about 15 years. That duck had never seen another duck and she thought she was a chicken. For many years my dad kept the chickens simply to keep the duck company. We called her Donald of course what else would you call a duck. We didn't have a library of any kind except for libraries in each classroom and school. Once a week we go over to the Montclair school. I guess you could call it a forerunner of the bookmobile they would come up and set the books up inside. I went to St. Luke's Episcopal church and that was expanded a lot over the years. There wasn't much built south of Colfax. The kids on the southside went to Montclair elementary and on the northside to Ashley elementary. We went to Smiley and they went to Gove. When we were kids here that was the only church except for the Catholic Church. There was a little Baptist Church where the Zion Church is now. That was there for many years. We went to vacation Bible school there. Right after the second world war we had 500 children in the Sunday school. That was the only church except the Catholic Church. Aurora didn't have any church so to speak of. In the 1940s times we're not good and when the war came along they were not building anything. They didn't send a bus around for the children. You got there on your own. In the late 1940s and early 1950s there were big families with five or six kids in the neighborhood. I was at the end of that period. Many kids were born in 1956 in 1957. We have to make our own amusement so it was kick the can and very simple game is because and if you own a baseball and a bat you were almost wealthy. Jacks, paper dolls, Momoli Paiges and jacks. Of course, at that time you could go down to the museum and the zoo for free. I can remember when we were kids they have some kind of band at city Park in the fountain and I can remember our parents taking us down there for the band concerts. Park Hill was built up not as thick as now but it was a very established neighborhood. West of Monaco was built up pretty good. We would go to Cheeseman Park because the Denver Post put on an opera there for years and years. You went to the park and sat on blankets. One year there was a terrible forest fire that was so big you could see it burning from cheesman park. That is the only thing I can distinctly remember about it. That was probably in the late 1930s. When I finish six grade there were 10 or 11 of us in that grade. Mary Grace used to live about 1610 Ulster St. and she was raised in this neighborhood. I don't think Rose Wilson came until after the world war. I don't think those houses were built yet. Mr. Woods had a body shop and they owned the red house and then they built the cream colored brick house and moved into it. On the side of Spruce Street it was built up. The house on the corner is a stucco house with a porch and a little bitty house. I think where they built the last vacant lot. On the other side there were houses down on this end of the other side. My husband and I went to the Beacon supper club very frequently before we were married. That was in the 1950s the first time I can remember going to the Beacon was when I went there with the man I married. We started going together in 1951. Willy and Jerry Hartsell. They didn't have dancing. It was so jammed into dance. I'll put it differently they were more interested in selling booze and food than putting people on the dance floor. Part of the deal was that they would have a show and then they would stop and then it was Time to have drinks. They push the booze on Saturday nights it would be very crowded. We would also go to the famous chef restaurant where Saturday's (PT's) strip club is now. That was an excellent restaurant the same people had a restaurant downtown. The food was superb. We would also go to the Yucca which was in a big building on the north side of East Colfax maybe at Beeler St. in Aurora. It was a big Mexican hacienda tight building. After the war the Yucca traded for a little place further down. What was the Yucca turned into one of those veterans organizations that showed up and disappeared and it was basically illegal gambling. Regarding the heavy vine covering all the front of her house my mother planted that vine and she was an invalid by 40 or 45 so it must be at least 50 years old. The trees are older than I am around the house. I know my mother worked at Colorado women's college when I was in high school. A lot of us in the neighborhood worked at the women's college. We set the tables clear the tables and made meals and if I remember clearly we were paid something like a dollar 25 a day plus our supper. The first job I had a 1945 was for Miller’s supermarket I made $.50 an hour. That was where that $.99 store is opening up (Family Dollar at Spruce and East Colfax) and there was one on Elm and Colfax Avenue, and one in Aurora. The streetcar turned around at Poplar Street and E. Colfax Avenue (called “the Loop” where Ace on the Fax is today) they sat back from where the streetcars turned around. They had the streetcar turn over there. It didn't turn on a turntable. And it was almost a complete circle so we had to slow down quite a bit to get around it. It was a little building in there and the buses came in on one side in the street cars on the other. My family had a little concession stand there for years and years and that was a place you could go inside and eat. Every so often something would happen on the streetcar. One of them would jump the track or when that happened the whole line would close down because there was no way to get around it. The streetcars went out about 1949 or 1950. Then they put an electric buses that ran like a bus but they ran on an overhead wire they didn't run on the track they were a lot more comfortable than the streetcar. In my younger dating days you went either to the moon drive-in, the pick a rib, or the oasis. They were all East of Colorado Boulevard down on E. Colfax Ave. about Cherry Street. I think there is a Winchells donuts shop there now. When I was a kid there was a barrel shaped one down there I know in the early 1950s that was an A&W root beer stand east of where the Apple tree shanty (Xanthia & Colfax where the VFW is) is on the same side of the street. That was the first drive-in I can remember in this part of town. Also the Famous Chef Restaurant (PT’s/Saturday’s Strip Club building) was really busy they had good food. I remember we had always have chicken livers they made beautiful chef salads. ColfaxAvenue.com

    East Colfax Neighborhood Association
    East Colfax Neighborhood Association, Denver, Colorado. 944 likes. A Registered Neighborhood Organization along East Colfax between Quebec and Yosemite!
    https://www.facebook.com

Nov 04

Nov 02

Vintage Theatre presents Red

Vintage Theatre presents

    Vintage Theatre presents Red
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 02

Poetry at Pete's Kitchen

    Poetry at Pete's Kitchen
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 02

Guido's Nickel Bar

You haven't lived until you've made Guido's Nickel Bar a part of your West Colfax Crawl! 

    Guido's Nickel Bar
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 02

Nov 01

#SeenOnColfax: Captain America!

    #SeenOnColfax: Captain America!
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Nov 01

Oct 29

Royal Host Motel

The Royal Host Motel is still standing today at 930 E. Colfax Avenue, only today it's a Days Inn.

    Royal Host Motel
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Oct 29

All Main Trails Lead to JCRS Shopping Center

    All Main Trails Lead to JCRS Shopping Center
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Oct 28

All Main Trails Lead to JCRS

    All Main Trails Lead to JCRS
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Oct 28

I Yam What I Yam at Popeye's Chicken

Ah Colfax, the more you change, the more you stay the same! What happens on Colfax has probably already happened on Colfax.

    I Yam What I Yam at Popeye's Chicken
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Oct 26

  • Auto theft

    • Larceny

      1600 block of N. Uinta St. October 19, 2017 @ 10 a.m. Comment

Oct 25

Oct 23

Bronco Cheeleaders 2017

I guess you could say I'm a Broncos Fan, but this view is what really gets me to the games!

    Bronco Cheeleaders 2017
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

Oct 23

Colfax Point

    Colfax Point
    Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in the USA, and truly one of the most unique streets anywhere. ColfaxAvenue.com is a definitive guide to the heart and soul of Colfax, which runs through Golden, Lakewood, Denver, Aurora, Strasburg, and Bennett, Colorado.
    http://www.colfaxavenue.com

About

EveryBlock collects 20 types of news in Denver — including articles, real estate listings, meetups and conversations neighbors are having — and organizes it by location. Here is all the recent news and discussion near 8200-8299 E. 17th Ave.

Thousands of neighbors connect and get their news via EveryBlock, including:

Annalise Dean Christine Cornish John Turner Sherry Moore Dee My Lauren Stewart Daniel Mendoza Cynthia R Holmes Patrick Murray K Acquisto

You're 60 seconds from creating an account and joining them…

or
Enter your email address

8200-8299 E. 17th Ave.